Unfinished, but of great historical importance: Dante's masterpiece as an example of the Trecento in illumination

Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome

Italy — 2nd half of the 14th century

Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome

Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome

Italy — 2nd half of the 14th century

  1. This outstanding Dante (ca. 1265–1321) manuscript also feature's two commentaries in addition to his magnum opus

  2. The manuscript is incomplete, but the 34 completed miniatures on gold backgrounds are art-historically significant

  3. The manuscript represents an outstanding example of Bolognese illumination during the Trecento

Divina Commedia Angelica

Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome

Canto XIV

Each of the three books of the Divine Comedy is divided into 33 so-called cantos and in this manuscript containing the Inferno, each canto is preceded by a miniature. After arriving at the walled City of Dis, which contains the sixth through ninth circles of Hell, they encounter heretics and then those guilty of violence. Those who have committed acts against God, Art, and Nature are doomed to eternity on a great Plain of Burning Sand where it continuously rains flakes of fire.

Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome

Alternative Titles:
  • Divina Commedia Angelica
  • Göttliche Komödie - Rom Codex
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
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  1. Short Description
  2. Codicology

Short Description

This outstanding manuscript of Dante’s Divina Commedia originated from Bologna during the Trecento. Illustrated with 34 impressive and groundbreaking miniatures, the codex contains two commentaries on the literary milestone in addition to the text itself and a fragment of a work by Gualterus de Castellione. In this way, the Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome, also known as the Roman Codex, offers a comprehensive inside view of this primary work of world literature and its reception both artistically and literarily.

Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome

Dante Alighieri (1265–1321) became one of the most important authors of world literature with his primary work, the Divine Comedy. Originating in the early Trecento and completed in the year 1321, the Divine Comedy is one of the most important works of world literature with exceptional significance for Italian literary history. The tale, in the course of which the author himself travels through hell, purgatory, and paradise, enjoyed an extensive reception and has influenced men of letters, artists, and other creative types up to today.

An Incomplete Masterpiece

The 34 miniatures, which adorn the manuscript from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome, make this a true jewel of art history. A master of illumination from Bologna – the names Simone dei Crocefissi, Oderisi da Gubbio, and Franco Bolognese have been discussed in the field of research – created the illustrated artwork, which accompanies the tale of the Inferno. Since the codex has remained incomplete, many places where miniatures were supposed to have been inserted later, remain white in the text of Purgatory and Paradise. Nonetheless, the 34 scenes presented are completely sufficient to land the codex an outstanding place in the history of Dante illustrations.

Elegant Exemplary Compositions

Rectangular narrow red frames surround these gorgeous miniatures on a gold background. These are integrated respectively into one of the two columns in which the text is arranged. Only the opening scene is depicted in a broader miniature. Elegant compositions accompany each section of the Inferno, synoptically illustrating the content and presenting the figures and episodes of the story. Furthermore, blue and red initials adorn the text, sometimes designed with the finest ornamentation. Therefore, the manuscript represents an outstanding example of Bolognese illumination in the Trecento. The high quality and creative décor of the manuscript shaped some significant iconographic standards of Dante illustration.

Dante’s Work and its Immediate Reception

Alongside this inestimable artistic content, the literary content of the manuscript should not be underestimated. Aside from Dante’s Divina Commedia, the codex also contains the commentaries by Jacopo Alighieri and Bosone da Gubbio with the title Capitolo Sulla Commedia, in addition to a fragment of the poem by Gualterus de Castellione about Alexander the Great. Thus, the codex is simultaneously a demonstration of the grandiose interest that Dante’s work enjoyed shortly after its creation.

Codicology

Alternative Titles
Divina Commedia Angelica
Göttliche Komödie - Rom Codex
Size / Format
208 pages / 34.7 x 23.7 cm
Origin
Italy
Date
2nd half of the 14th century
Illustrations
34 large miniatures
Content
Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy along with Jacopo Alighieri’s and Bosone da Gubbio’s commentaries entitled Capitolo sulla Commedia, and a fragment of the poem on the history of Alexander the Great written by Gualterus de Castellione.
Artist / School
Divina Commedia Angelica

Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome

Dante Meets Virgil

The great magnum opus begins on the night before Good Friday in the year 1300 with the author/protagonist lost in a dark wood and being pursued by a lion, a leopard, and a she-wolf. The forest represents sin and each of the three beasts represents a different kind of sin: the self-indulgent, the violent, and the malicious. Hell is later divided according to these classifications.

Dante, dressed in pink with a blue hat and sleeves, is rescued by the esteemed ancient Roman author Virgil, who stands confidently on the right wearing a red cap and blue cloak trimmed in fur with a red tunic on underneath. Virgil then accompanies Dante on his journey to the underworld. The scene is illuminated by a wonderful gold leaf background.

1 available facsimile edition(s) of „Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome“

Divina Commedia Angelica
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
Divine Comedy from the Biblioteca Angelica in Rome – Ms. 1102 – Biblioteca Angelica (Rome, Italy)
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Divina Commedia Angelica

Publisher
Imago – Castel Guelfo, 2016
Limited Edition
599 copies
Binding
Leather
Commentary
1 volume by Marco Veglia and Massimo Medica
More Information
Reproduction of the entire original document as detailed as possible (scope, format, colors). The binding may not correspond to the original or current document binding.
Price Category: €€€ (3,000€ - 7,000€)
Edition available
Price: Login here!
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