Eton Roundels

Eton Roundels

Probably near Worcester, England (United Kingdom) — Second half of the 13th century

Eton Roundels

  1. Description
  2. Facsimile Editions (1)
Description
Eton Roundels

English Apocalypse manuscripts, especially those from the Gothic period, were some of the most extraordinary and influential specimens of their genre. The Eton College Library holds a composite manuscript of English Apocalypse texts under the shelf mark MS 177, the first part of which is known as “The Eton Roundels”. It comprises 12 pages, each consisting of five medallions and two half-medallions depicting biblical types and antitypes from the Old and New Testaments. Each page is designed with a circular medallion at the center and at each corner with the two half-medallions placed on the sides. An enthroned and crowned female figure representing a virtue can be found in each bas-de-page along with a précis of one of the Ten Commandments. Created during the 1260’s, the manuscript was rebound in the late 17th century before being given as a gift from Sr John Sherard of Lobthorp in Lincolnshire to Stuart Bickerstaffe.

Codicology

Alternative Titles
Figurae bibliorum
Size / Format
8 folios / 27.5 × 18.8 cm
Date
Second half of the 13th century
Style
Language
Script
Gothic textualis semiquadrata
Illustrations
12 miniatures
Facsimile Editions

#1 The Eton Roundels: Eton College MS 177 ("Figurae bibliorum") – a colour facsimile

1 volume: Exact reproduction of the original document (extent, color and size) Reproduction of the entire original document as detailed as possible (scope, format, colors). The binding may not correspond to the original or current document binding.
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