Tudela Codex

Tudela Codex

Mexico — Mid 16th century

Insight into a lost world: a unique testimonial to the religion, clothing, rituals, and language of the Aztecs

  1. This manuscript immerses the reader in the exotic world of a downfallen culture

  2. Aztec hieroglyphics offer an inside glimpse of their religion, dress, rituals, and language

  3. It is a significant cultural-historical discovery of the 20th century by José Tudela de la Orden

Tudela Codex

  1. Description
  2. Facsimile Editions (1)
Description
Tudela Codex

The so-called Tudela Codex is a true treasure trove of Mexico’s Aztec culture prior to settlement by conquering Europeans. Named after its discoverer, the Spanish ethnologist José Tudela de la Orden, the manuscript is a significant cultural-historical discovery of the 20th century. The richly-illustrated Tudela Codex, originating from the mid–16th century, makes it possible to glimpse into the religions, rituals, language, and other interesting aspects of Aztec culture. With its seemingly archaic illustrations, e.g. of ritual sacrifices and the dress of the indigenous peoples of Mexico, it is simultaneously an outstanding artifact for both the study of a downfallen culture as well as for simple immersion in an exotic world!

Tudela Codex

The so-called Tudela Codex is a true treasure trove of Mexico’s Aztec culture prior to settlement by conquering Europeans. Named after its discoverer, the Spanish ethnologist José Tudela de la Orden, the manuscript is a significant cultural-historical discovery of the 20th century. The richly-illustratedTudela Codex, originating from the mid–16th century, makes it possible to glimpse into the religions, rituals, language, and other interesting aspects of Aztec culture. With its seemingly archaic illustrations, e.g. of ritual sacrifices and the dress of the indigenous peoples of Mexico, it is simultaneously an outstanding artifact for both the study of a downfallen culture as well as for simple immersion in an exotic world!

Gods, Warriors, Mythic Creatures

A gruesome sacrifice for the honor of the gods, with bloody sacrifices and a fantastic, terrifying idol; depictions of warriors in colorful armor and costumes as well as other archaic illustrations, e.g. of gods and fantastic creatures: impressive depictions illustrate the 125 pages of the Tudela Codex, which probably originated ca. the mid–16th century in modern Mexico. This period, when the colonization of Mexico by the conquistadores was beginning, was the last time to record the endangered culture of the indigenous Aztecs for posterity.

The Exotic World of the Aztecs

The Tudela Codex belongs to the group of Magliabechiano Manuscripts. It consists of three books – the Libro Indígena, the Libro Pintado Europeo, and the Libro Escrito Europeo – and is of grandiose cultural-historical significance as an original document. The manuscript contains, inter alia, an Aztec calendar, in which the mythical figures of Aztec culture are presented. The “lord of the night” and the “bird of the day” are to be found, inter alia. Additionally, the codex offers the opportunity to glimpse into the system of Aztec hieroglyphics and conveys unbelievably exciting aspects of the religion, rituals, and language of the indigenous peoples of Central America.

A 20th Century Discovery

The Tudela Codex was lost and forgotten for a long time and was first rediscovered in the year 1940. It gained its modern name from its discoverer: Josè Tudela de la Orden, an early–20th century Spanish ethnographer whose numerous travels inquired into the culture of bygone epochs and civilizations. He stumbled upon the Aztec codex through lucky coincidence. This was purchased by the Spanish government and is found today in the Museo de América in Madrid.

Codicology

Alternative Titles
Códice Tudela
Códice de Tudela
Códice del Museo de América
Tudela-Codex
Size / Format
125 pages / 21.5 × 16.2 cm
Origin
Mexico
Date
Mid 16th century

Available facsimile editions:
Tudela Codex – Museo de América (Madrid, Spain)
Testimonio Compañía Editorial – Madrid, 2002
Limited Edition: 980 copies
Facsimile Editions

#1 Códice Tudela

Publisher: Testimonio Compañía Editorial – Madrid, 2002
Limited Edition: 980 copies
Binding: Hand stitched and bound in natural parchment printed on the back. Closures in leather and twine identical to the original.
Commentary: 1 volume by Juan José Batalla
Language: Spanish
1 volume: Exact reproduction of the original document (extent, color and size) Reproduction of the entire original document as detailed as possible (scope, format, colors). The binding may not correspond to the original or current document binding.
Price Category: €€ (1,000€ - 3,000€)
Edition available
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