Art of the Moghul Era

Art of the Moghul Era

India — 16th–18th cemtury

A fascinating insight into the rich, diverse artistic tradition of the legendary Mughals

  1. Founded in 1526, the Mughal Empire was an Islamic superpower that ruled over most of the Indian subcontinent

  2. The Mughals were descended from Genghis Khan and Timur, but became increasingly Indian and Persian due to dynastic marriages

  3. Rembrandt's art collection, auctioned in Amsterdam in 1656, included the first album with Indian miniatures found in Europe

Art of the Moghul Era

  1. Description
  2. Facsimile Editions (1)
Description
Art of the Moghul Era

The Mughal (or Mogul) Empire ruled over most of South Asia for more than three centuries and aside from being the richest state of the period, it developed its own unique artistic style. Mughal painting blended indigenous Indian art with Islamic, Persian, and even Chinese influences to create a particularly refined and elaborate aesthetic. Mughal miniatures had a distinct influence on successive artistic styles, particularly in northern India.

Art of the Mughal Era

Founded in 1526, the Mughal Empire was an Islamic superpower that ruled over most of the Indian subcontinent and parts of Afghanistan for 325 years. The ruling class could trace their roots to both Genghis Khan (ca. 1162–1227) and Timur (1336–1405) also known as Tamerlane, but became increasingly Indian and Persian due to dynastic marriages. At its height, Emperor Aurangzeb (1618–1707) ruled over one quarter of the world’s population as well as the largest economy in the world with a GDP ten times that of France under Louis XIV (1638–1715). This tremendous wealth, when paired with the massive polyglot population, produced a rich cultural and artistic heritage. It evolved from Persian miniature painting, which was itself heavily influenced by Chinese art, in addition to influences from the Hindu, Jain, Turkic, and Buddhist artistic traditions. It is distinguished from its Persianate predecessors by adopting a more realistic style for plants, animals, and portraits. Other elements of the Persian artistic tradition, especially richly-decorated borders, were continued and refined. Art from the Orient was a source of great fascination in Early Modern Europe. When Rembrandt's art collection was auctioned off in Amsterdam in 1656, the first album with Indian miniatures found in Europe was among them. The ten folios assembled here represent are from this historic and exotic collection. Each of the original facsimile edition pages consists of two parts: an interior piece with the actual scenic representation and matting richly ornamented with gold and silver.

Codicology

Alternative Titles
Kassette Kunst der Moghulzeit
Size / Format
10 leaves / 38.5 × 26.0 cm
Origin
India
Date
16th–18th cemtury
Language
Illustrations
10 miniatures
Content
Ten leaves from important manuscripts

Available facsimile editions:
Art of the Mogul Era – Several Owners
Coron Verlag – Gütersloh, 1991
Limited Edition: 1495 copies
Facsimile Editions

#1 Kassette Kunst der Moghulzeit

Coron Verlag – Gütersloh, 1991

Publisher: Coron Verlag – Gütersloh, 1991
Limited Edition: 1495 copies
Binding: Box
Commentary: 1 volume
Language: German
1 volume: 10 leaves under passe-partouts: Exact reproduction of the original document (extent, color and size) Reproduction of the entire original document as detailed as possible (scope, format, colors). The binding may not correspond to the original or current document binding.
Price Category: € (under 1,000€)
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